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Gulliver’s Travels, by Jonathan Swift

Posted by admin on November 25, 2010

Gulliver's Travels

Gulliver’s Travels (1726, amended 1735), is a novel by Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the “travellers’ tales” literary sub-genre. It is Swift’s best known full-length work, and a classic of English literature.

The book became tremendously popular as soon as it was published (John Gay said in a 1726 letter to Swift that “it is universally read, from the cabinet council to the nursery”); since then, it has never been out of print.

PLOT SUMMARY

The book presents itself as a simple traveller’s narrative with the disingenuous title Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, its authorship assigned only to “Lemuel Gulliver, first a surgeon, then a captain of several ships”. The text is presented as a first-person narrative by the supposed author, and the name “Gulliver” appears nowhere in the book other than the title page. Different editions contain different versions of the prefatory material which are basically the same as forewords in modern books. The book proper then is divided into four parts, which are as follows. [Read more…]

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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